Travel Australian Education resources for international students including; Admissions, International Education, Study English Programs, MBA, Student Life, Travel, Study in australia, and free email accounts via australia mail http://www.australia.edu/travel/ Sat, 06 May 2017 08:55:03 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb The Top 10 Things to Do in Australia http://www.australia.edu/Travel/the-top-10-things-to-do-in-australia.html http://www.australia.edu/Travel/the-top-10-things-to-do-in-australia.html No other place in the world combines wild, scenic beauty and sophisticated entertainment as well as Australia. Whether it's rock climbing or wine tasting, Australia offers the finest in outdoor adventure and as well as the excitement of city life.

Below is a list of 10 must-see Australian attractions:

1. Queensland's Gold Coast Beaches

Skyview of Queensland Gold Coast Beachs

With over 35 miles of coastline, the 21 Gold Coast beaches offer just the right mix of activity and relaxation. Whether you want a quiet place to lay in the sun or are ready to surf the waves, there is a beach for for you. Breath taking views and conveniently located amenities ensure a comfortable and exciting time.

2. Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House

Often called the face of Australia, the Sydney Opera House is a marvel of architectural design. With its exquisite acoustics and physical presence, the Sydney Opera House is widely recognized as a world class performance arts center. See a show or take a tour – the Sydney Opera House is not to be missed.

3. Royal Botanical Gardens

Royal Botanical Gardens

Just a short walk from the Sydney Opera House, the Royal Botanical Gardens is one of the most beautiful botanical gardens in the world. More than one million botanical specimens may be viewed and there is a train available to take visitors from one spot to another.

4. Sidney Tower's 360 Bar and Dining

360 Bar and dining room at the top of Sydney Tower

Pamper yourself with elegant service and modern Australian cuisine prepared by award winning chefs at the 360 Restaurant located 80 stories above Sydney. The illuminated shell bar offers spectacular city views and a variety of cocktails and wines.

5. Australian Outback

Australian Outback

Considered one of the few remaining wilderness areas in the world, the Outback is a rugged expanse of desert and kangaroos and, in the northern part of its range, a wet/dry tropical climate with gorges and waterfalls. Driving tours for short visits and hiking tours for longer stays are available.

6. Australian Museum

Australian Museum

Everything from mummies to dinosaurs has a place in the Australian Museum. Learn all about Australia, its inhabitants, geography, and interesting wild life. Visitors may take a guided tour or get a map and explore on their own.

7. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Hug one of the world's most endearing animals, the koala. Near Brisbane, the Sanctuary is also home to Australia's native kangaroos, emus, and wallabies. Enjoy feeding the animals and learning more about Australia's wildlife.

8. Daintree Village

Daintree Village

Daintree Village on the banks of the Daintree River is a look into the past. River tours range from crocodile and wildlife spotting tours to Aboriginal culture tours. Go fishing, experience what it's like to work in a cattle station, visit museums, and enjoy the services at the Silky Oaks Spa.

9. Victorian Alps

Victorian Alps

In the summer, hike the peaks, fish, rock climb, or bike the Victorian Alps for phenomenal mountain views. In the winter, experience the best skiing Australia has to offer. Near Melbourne, there are plenty of resorts and hotels for quiet respite.

10. Great Barrier Reef

Great Barrier Reef

The world's largest coral reef is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Australia. Diving, surfing, snorkeling, and fishing are popular activities. Rental equipment is available and beginning scuba diving classes are offered for those who are new to the sport.

Australia is a land rich in cultural and natural diversity. Australia boasts a distinctive landscape and unique wildlife not found in any other continent in the world. A visit to Australia is an opportunity to experience more than a vacation. It's a chance to see the world in a new way.

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admin@australia.edu (Administrator) travel Wed, 10 Mar 2010 19:15:49 +0000
Australia's Top Town: Yamba, New South Wales http://www.australia.edu/Travel/australias-top-town-yamba-new-south-wales.html http://www.australia.edu/Travel/australias-top-town-yamba-new-south-wales.html Nestled amongst the trees along the northern coast of New South Wales, there is a charming little fishing village named Yamba. Until recently, Yamba was a relatively undiscovered coastal jewel where its 5600 residents lived in relative solitude in this idyllic setting just down the way from Angourie, a far more famous town with one of the most popular surf breaks in all of Australia.

main beach yamba 

But now this once little-known village has topped the list of towns in Australia and has become a must-see tourist destination for Aussies and international travelers alike. Yamba was named Australia’s top town in a survey of travel and tourism experts conducted by Australian Traveller magazine, well-known for their annual lists of the best and worst towns in Australia.

 

Although the Australian Traveller opted to forego their worst town list this year – which previously included towns like West Wyalong in New South Wales and Zeehan in Tasmania – the 100 best towns list was published as usual.
yamba_in_new_south_whales

Of note are the top ten towns, including:
• Yamba, New South Wales
• Esperance, Western Australia
• Port Douglas, Queensland
• Broome, Western Australia
• Port Fairy, Victoria
• Beechworth, Victoria
• Byron Bay, New South Wales
• Apollo Bay, Victoria
• Strahan, Tasmania
• Margaret River, Western Australia


According to this survey, New South Wales is certainly a must-see state, as it contains 29 of the top 100 towns – more than any other state in Australia.

Now that the Australian Traveller has let the secret out, Yamba residents may have to share their serene coastal village. While Yamba will undoubtedly retain its old-world charm, it may just become a hopping seaside tourist town.
yamba_Beautiful_beach

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admin@australia.edu (Administrator) travel Thu, 16 Apr 2009 01:13:14 +0000
Different types of Transportation for traveling around Australia http://www.australia.edu/Travel/different-types-of-transportation-for-traveling-around-australia.html http://www.australia.edu/Travel/different-types-of-transportation-for-traveling-around-australia.html Greyhound bus Australia

Getting to Australia
Flying is the most desired way to get to Australia, although the flight may be extremely long.
•    Plane
Pretty much everyone who travels to Australia gets there by plane.  The major airports in Australia are Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, followed by Perth, Adelaide, Hobart, Darwin and Cairns. Their are a lot of connector flights from Asia, Europe and the USA, because of Australia’s seclusion. Flights usually get booked quickly, so make your flight plans early.
Transportation around Australia
The distances between cities in Australia are pretty large, so flying domestically is a popular and  quick option.  However, you will get more of a scenic journey if you take the train or bus, but at the expense of a longer travel time.  In the major cities, you will notice that the rail and bus systems are extremely organized and punctual.
•    Bus
Their are various long-distance bus companies, the only national service is Greyhound Australia.  Although the buses are pretty cozy and you will have a smooth ride, it will be a long journey if you are travelling between major cities.  Another option is Australia’s rail network, which connects all major cities.
Transportation by Train in Australia

•    Vehicle

It is very typical for visitors to rent or even purchase a car. If you are staying for an extended trip or will be studying abroad for a couple months, then renting a car can be very economical. Stick to Highway 1 because it circumnavigates Australia and keeps close to the coast for a great scenic drive.
•    Rail
The train is the slowest source of transportation and in fact pretty expensive as well. The upside to the train is that is faster then the bus and also provides a scenic route. Most people do not take the train when travelling long distances unless they prefer doing an overnight trip.
•    Plane
Most of the long-distance journeys from major cities is made by air, about 80%.  Australia’s main domestic airline is Qantas and its low budget alternative is called Jetstar.  One of their competitors is Virgin Blue, which also covers all of Australia.  Make sure to get a good bargain on your tickets because the airlines tend to offer a lot of discounts and Internet special fares.  Spend some time searching for discounts and avoid paying the full price.

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admin@australia.edu (Administrator) travel Wed, 15 Oct 2008 08:38:15 +0000
Expert Advice for traveling around Australia http://www.australia.edu/Travel/expert-advice-for-traveling-around-australia.html http://www.australia.edu/Travel/expert-advice-for-traveling-around-australia.html Off roading in the Crichton Australian Outback

Australian OutbackPointers for Traveling and Vacationing in Australia

Make sure to pack cloths that are suitable to the region and months that you are going to be vacationing in Australia. It can get very cold in some areas of Australia during the winter time. Also know the months and seasons compared to your home countries months and seasons. For example Australia’s seasons are the opposite of what they are in the United States. June and August are winter time in Australia and December is summertime.
Tipping in the United States is normal and almost expected when you eat out at restaurants. In Australia tipping is not expected and should not be considered.

Also a majority of shops are open seven days a week.

Hints about Driving in Australia
There are times when driving from one city to another is the best way of seeing Australia.  But there are some driving rules that will change the way you normally drive in the U.S.
Australians drive on the left side of the road.  This will feel awkward at first but with a little bit of practice you will get the hang of it. Also it is unacceptable driver’s etiquette to honk your horn unless you are trying to prevent someone from crashing into you.
If you have been drinking, then you should not drive at all, but be aware that the legal blood alcohol level is .05.
Additionally, with a U.S. driver’s license you should have no problem renting a car in Australia to travel around in.Driving in Australia
Keeping safe while traveling Australia
Although Australia is a gorgeous country, it can be very unsafe for those who do not take the time to prepare.  For example, before journeying into the rugged terrain of the Outback, there are a number of different dangers that need to be prepared for.  First of all, you will need plenty of water, a full tank of petroleum for your car, a compass and other essential survival items that need to be kept in your car before you go on your adventure.  Additionally, you should also take into account the environment’s wildlife as many can attack you or cause injury.  Before journeying into unfamiliar territory such as the Outback, you should always do some research on your own so that you understand what possible dangers can arise.  
The most crucial thing that will help your Australian experience be the best ever, is to do your research about the country and familiarize yourself with the places you want to visit.  Although the U.S. and Australia have a lot of similarities, the smaller things can make a big difference on your trip if you are aware and prepared for them.]]>
admin@australia.edu (Administrator) travel Wed, 15 Oct 2008 02:22:31 +0000